Mike the Psych's Blog

What if psychologists ruled the world? In real life?


Helmshore Textile Museum part 2

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I wrote about the textile museum in a previous post and included photographs of the machinery in use at the time. However I was also interested in its social history and the interesting additions to our everyday language.

The museum also includes displays of the mill offices and the quality control machines, a typewriter and a clocking-in machine.DSC02118DSC02121DSC02119DSC02120

When I started work in the 1960s and worked in old mills which had been converted for modern use we still had those type-writers and clocking in machines.

(They even had them during war-time e.g. in the factories building Zeppelins in Friederichshaven, Germany).

And clocking-in machines were still widely used in the 1990s in many businesses.

There were also lots of rules to follow e.g. no swearing, no smoking (for obvious safety reasons), and no sharing the lavatory! Workers were also told how often they should wash and bathe themselves.

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Back in…

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Helmshore Textile Museum part 1

After reading my colleague’s blog about the silk mills I remembered we’d visited this museum some years ago and found it similarly fascinating

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It’s been a while since I last visited this Rossendale Valley museum and a photographer friend wanted to see it so we headed there after stopping for a tasty snack at Holden Wood tea shop.

Helmshore is now part of Lancashire County Council’s Pennine Lancashire museums along with Gawthorpe Hall in Padiham, Towneley Hall in Burnley, and Queen Street Mill at Harle Syke in Burnley among others.

The museum comprises two mills, Higher Mill which was a woollen fulling mill built in 1789 and powered by a 20 ton water wheel, and Whitaker’s Mill, built in the mid 19th century specialising in cotton spinning mill, starting from waste recycled cotton and finishing with mule spun yarn.

There is a bright new entrance and reception area. The staff were really friendly and the guides very knowledgeable. We had to get permission to take photographs and flash photography wasn’t allowed which made…

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