Mike the Psych's Blog

What if psychologists ruled the world? In real life?


10,000 steps has no scientific basis. Another health myth bites the dust

Public Health chiefs have announced that you are better off going for a brisk walk than trying to achieve 10,000 steps a day.

They think the 10,000 steps idea came from a pedometer manufacturers in Japan and has no scientific basis.

In terms of people getting the full health benefits they really need to make sure that they exercise to a moderate intensity. That includes walking, gardening and housework as long as it makes you breathe faster and raises your heart rate.

Two and a half hours a week or half that if you do vigorous exercise such as running. As 20% of middle-aged adults only do half an hour a week there is a long way to go. Starting with a daily ten-minute brisk walk – half the official guidance – would be a good start.

Previous posts on exercise

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Golf, gardening and housework ..

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figure_sweeping_800_10765said to reduce risk of serious diseases. Really?

Gardening – risk of tetanus, nettle rash, slug pellet poisoning, not to mention muscle strain from digging.

Housework – falling off ladders, scolding yourself, dangerous cleaning chemicals, electric shocks, and dust mites.

Golf – getting drunk at 19th hole, boredom if you don’t play, being hit by a stray ball, being hit by lightening..

Need I say more?

So why do experts think these things are good for your health?

Basically it’s the exercise involved. They say we should be doing five times the WHO recommended minimum.

Playing an extra round of golf or gardening for a few more hours each week can help prevent five of the most common chronic diseases.

The research is based on 174 studies published since 1980 and the analysis found that increasing a person’s exercise level from 600 minutes a week to 3,000 -4,000 a week reduced…

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Gardening for peace and love

Otrazhenie

Gardening

From Hippie Peace Freaks

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Seattle’s First Urban Food Forest Will Be Open To Foragers

Now, Washington state has jumped on the foraging bandwagon with plans to develop a 7-acre public plot into a food forest. The kicker? The lot sits smack in the middle of Seattle.

The idea is to give members of the working-class neighborhood of Beacon Hill the chance to pick plants scattered throughout the park – dubbed the Beacon Food Forest. It will feature fruit-bearing perennials —  apples, pears, plums, grapes, blueberries, raspberries and more.

A Food Forest is a gardening technique or land management system that mimics a woodland ecosystem but substitutes in edible trees, shrubs, perennials and annuals. Fruit and nut trees are the upper level, while below are berry shrubs, edible perennials and annuals. Companions or beneficial plants are included to attract insects for natural pest management while some plants…

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