Mike the Psych's Blog

What if psychologists ruled the world? In real life?

Nurses have no time for compassion

On the one hand the idea that all nurses are compassionate creatures was never true. I say that as someone with 20 plus years experience working in the NHS and more recently as a patient.

That’s not to say some, maybe most, nurses aren’t. I particularly remember one who held my hand throughout an uncomfortable 2-hour eye operation carried out under local anaesthetic and another who rubbed my back during an endoscopy examination.

But according to a recent study of professional values there is “a moral vacuum at the heart of nursing”.

Nurses are so ground down that they end up as “robots going through the motions” with a focus on clinical skills driving compassion from the job“. Yet compassion is part of the UK’s Nursing Vision.

Eight out of ten say their work conflicts with their personal values much of the time. The study concluded that it was that moral disengagement that leads to patients being put at risk.

Kristen Kristjansson, the psychologist from the University of Birmingham who led the study, said that the state of nursing was far more depressing than any other profession he had studied including lawyers, teachers, and doctors.

He added “When you have been working for five years or more you usually realise that following the rules is not the only important thing. You have to rely on your moral compass” But the nurses didn’t.

In the study of 700 nurses almost half of them sad they acted the way they did because it was what the rules decreed rather than because it was the right thing to do.

The only standard was what was laid down in the codes. Unlike other professions they did;t seem to pick up on their own values as they got more experienced.

This is bad news for patients who can tell when someone is going through the motions. The nurses say they don’t have time to show care and compassion and often come away from patients feeling they could have done more.

Professor Kristjansson worries that this “Mr Spock” mentality means they could struggle in a morally stressful situation such as happened at Mid Staffs where few nurses felt able to speak out about patient neglect.

He thought it was positive that nurses were now seen as a professionals requiring degree-level skills rather than just as assistants to doctors but felt the pendulum had swung too much the other way, away from the ethical core of nursing. Nurses since Florence Nightingale had done more than administer medicines – they created an ethos in hospitals to put patients at ease.

Sir Robert Francis QC, who chaired the public inquiry into the Mid Staffs scandal, backed up the Professor’s calls for more emphasis on virtue and character in nurses’ training.

A commonly accepted set of values has to be the foundation of professional practice to enable those with this vocation to navigate the ethical dilemmas they face daily”.

Janet Davies, chief executive of the Royal College of Nursing, said the report “demonstrates the emotional pressure on caring professions who, when faced with an inability to work as they know they should, become compromised”.

It’s almost five years since they decided to overhaul the training of health care assistants and introduced compassion as on of the 6Cs of nursing care (see post). Other research has shown compassion is a key characteristic of the best carers and there are questions about whether or not a degree  is really necessary?

It seems like we continually re-invent the wheel as far as nursing is concerned

The way things are going we will have fewer whistleblowers (not that the NHS has a good reputation for the way they treat such people) and the only way to wake people up will be another crisis.


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Its the atheist dudes who are most generous…………

.. and it’s not the only thing in which they come out better than religious people

Kindadukish's Blog - I am not a number, I am a free man (The Prisoner)


AN ARGUMENT often advanced for the encouragement of religion is that, to paraphrase St Matthew’s report of Jesus’s words, it leads people to love their neighbours as themselves. That would be a powerful point were it true. But is it? This was the question Jean Decety, a developmental neuroscientist at the University of Chicago, asked in a study just published in Current Biology.

Dr Decety is not the first to wonder, in a scientific way, about the connection between religion and altruism. He is, though, one of the first to do it without recourse to that standard but peculiar laboratory animal beloved of psychologists, the undergraduate student. Instead, he collaborated with researchers in Canada, China, Jordan, South Africa and Turkey, as well as with fellow Americans, to look at children aged between five and 12 and their families.

Altogether, Dr Decety and his colleagues recruited 1,170 families for their project…

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Mother Teresa…..”responsible for innumerable deaths, untold suffering and proud of it”

Kindadukish's Blog - I am not a number, I am a free man (The Prisoner)

The canonisation ceremony  of Mother Teresa is due to take place at Vatican on Sunday after the church fast-tracked her for sainthood. Heads of government and various dignitaries will travel to Rome for the ceremony with something like six hundred press in attendance.

Mother Teresa is already a saint in many people’s eyes because of her reputation for “good work” amongst the poor and ill in India. Government leaders fell over themselves to be seen with her, she was awarded the Nobel Prize and travelled the world publicising the work that she did. Along the way she managed to raise millions of dollars for her cause.

Amongst all the “hero worshipping” of Mother Teresa was one very loud dissenting voice, namely Christopher Hitchens


While Christopher Hitchens offered up in-depth essays and critiques on many notable figures and political movements, hardly any public figure saw as much criticism as Mother Teresa…

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A degree in nursing isn’t everything

nurse_figure_pushing_pill_1600_wht_14162The fact that nursing is now a graduate occupation doesn’t always mean that patients will benefit.

According to the Chief Executive at a London NHS Trust 1 in 3 of these graduate nurses are rejected because they fail simple numeracy and literacy tests. They have to pass tests in compassion (which is part of the UK Nursing Vision) as well but 83% of candidates from one London University failed in at least one of the three tests.

The tests are based on simple drug calculations which nurses need to know so that they can dispense medication safely.

The Chief Executive said that “while many nurses were well-trained and compassionate more should be done by universities taking responsibility for these basic skills and it should’t be left to the employing Trust to teach basic maths”.

At another London NHS Foundation Trust 15% of its nursing applicants failed similar drug calculation tests.

Dr Peter Carter, general secretary of the Royal College of Nursing said “modern nursing requires high standards in numeracy and literacy so it is vital that these skills are properly assessed at the recruitment stage”.

Professor Ieuan Ellis, Vice-chairman of the Council of Deans of Health which represents universities which train nurses, denied that graduates were ill-prepared for work on the wards. He said “UK data shows that between 81% and 100% go on to graduate=level jobs (and) if there was evidence of a widespread problem we’d be happy to follow it up but this view is simply not backed up by the data“.

Well it is at those two trusts and who do you believe, the employer or someone with a vested interest in running nursing courses?

The Sunday times gave examples of the test questions which are like these below.

  • A patient is prescribed 30mg of a drug which comes in 15mg tablets. How many tablets should the patient receive?
  • Another patient is prescribed 50mg of a drug which comes in 25mg tablets. How many should the patient be given?
  • A drug comes in 2.5mg tablets. How many would you give a patient who needs 12.5 mg?


Heroism and Compassion: John Rabe



Heroes in real life rarely look like the all-mighty supermen or superwomen from books and movies. They might speak different languages, live in different parts of the world, wear different clothes, belong to different generations.  What is common between all heroes is their belief, that with their microscopic efforts and stubborn persistence they can make this world a better place; their devotion to something bigger than them.

On my blog I like collecting stories of compassions featuring real heroes. My collection includes a few stories from the World War 2, such as:

However heroism and compassion are not confined to wars, as demonstrated by numerous examples from all over the world, including the following:

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True Compassion is an Action: stop the fatal love of suffering


From Mother Teresa and the fatal love of suffering

Unfortunately, there is a lot of suffering in this world. What should we do when we see someone suffering? To me the answer is simple: Do not conform any longer to the pattern of this world. Work hard for the positive change in this world by combating suffering. To me that’s the true nature of compassion and empathy, morality and spirituality. I could never understand why so many religious leaders and ambassadors refuse to take action, opting for prolonging suffering on this planet. Mother Teresa’s work provides an example of that approach.

Hitchens-Mother-TeresaFrom Mother Teresa Was No Humanitarian

The myth of altruism and generosity surrounding Mother Teresa is dispelled in a paper by Serge Larivée and Genevieve Chenard of University of Montreal’s Department of Psychoeducation and Carole Sénéchal of the University of Ottawa’s Faculty of Education.  These researchers collected 502 documents on the life and…

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